q&more
My watch list
my.chemie.de  
Login  

Author

Prof. Dr. Gerhard K. E. Scriba

Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena, Institut für Pharmazeutische/Medizinische Chemie

born 1956, studied pharmacy in Bonn and in 1980 received the licence to practise pharmacy. He received his doctorate in 1984 at the Westphalian Wilhelms-University in Munster, where, in 1995, he qualified as a professor in the subject of pharmaceutical chemistry. In 1999 he was appointed to the position of C3-Professor for Pharmaceutical Chemistry with a focus on Pharmaceutical Analysis at the Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, and since 2005 he has been managing director of the Institute of Pharmacy. He is a member of the Scientific Advisory Board of the Federal Institute for Drugs and Medical Devices (BfArM) and the “Pharmaceutical Chemistry” Committee of the Pharmacopoeia. His research was awarded the Rottendorf Prize (1995) and the Doberreiner Prize of the German Pharmaceutical Society (1997). Scriba is co-editor of the commentary to the European Pharmacopoeia and the journal Chromatographia, and a member of the editorial boards of Electrophoresis, Journal of Pharmaceutical and Biomedical Analysis, Journal of Separation Science, Pharmazie and Pharmeuropa. He is the author or coauthor of over 125 scientific publications and 11 book contributions. His research interests include the analysis of drugs and peptides using capillary electrophoresis, particularly stereoisomer analysis and the development of capillary electrophoresis enzyme assays.

Other articles by this author

All articles

Molecules in the mirror

In 1871 the children‘s book “Through the Looking-Glass – And What Alice Found There” by the English author Lewis Carroll, in which Alice enters a world behind the mirror, was published. (…)

More about Uni Jena

  • News

    Motion pictures from living cells

    In order to observe cells at work, researchers have to bypass a physical law. One of the fastest techniques to overcome the resolution limit of classical light microscopy is high-resolution structured illumination microscopy. It makes visible details that are about a hundred nanometres in s ... more

    Fungus produces highly effective surfactant

    Mortierella alpina lives in the soil and likes to keep cool. This fungus, which belongs to the zygomycetes, grows best at temperatures of 10 to 15°C and occurs mainly in alpine or arctic habitats. In biotechnology, the fungus has been used for the large-scale production of polyunsaturated f ... more

    Simulating nature’s cosmic laboratory, one helium droplet at a time

    Two astronomers from the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy and from the University of Jena have found an elegant new method to measure the energy of simple chemical reactions, under similar conditions as those encountered by atoms and molecules in the early solar system. Their method promi ... more

  • q&more articles

    Genes on sugar

    The targeted transport of DNA and RNA using vectors (mostly made from synthetic polymers) in cell cultures has become part of routine practice in biological R&D – a fact highlighted by the multitude of commercial kits now available. To date, however, obstacles relating to use in patients ha ... more

    Highly-prized components

    The isolation of bioactive plant ingredients, essential oils or dyes and flavourings of plant origin requires costly and sophisticated procedures. Several applications do not actually require isolation of the individual components, however – their concentration is sufficient. Moreover, for ... more

    Molecules in the mirror

    In 1871 the children‘s book “Through the Looking-Glass – And What Alice Found There” by the English author Lewis Carroll, in which Alice enters a world behind the mirror, was published. She explains to her cat: “First there’s the room you can see through the glass – that’s just the same as ... more

  • Authors

    Prof. Dr. Thomas Heinze

    Thomas Heinze, born in 1958, studied chemistry at FSU Jena. After receiving his doctorate there in 1989 and subsequent postdoc work at KU Leuven (Belgium), he completed his habilitation in 1997. In 2001, he accepted a professorship in Macromolecular Chemistry at the University of Wuppertal ... more

    Prof. Dr. Dagmar Fischer

    Dagmar Fischer is a licensed pharmacist before obtaining her doctorate in pharmaceutical technology and biopharmacy from the Philipps University of Marburg in 1997. After a period spent at Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center (USA), she gained several years' experience as Head of Pr ... more

q&more – the networking platform for quality excellence in lab and process

The q&more concept is to increase the visibility of recent research and innovative solutions, and support the exchange of knowledge. In the broad spectrum of subjects covered, the focus is on achieving maximum quality in highly innovative sectors. As a modern knowledge platform, q&more offers market participants one-of-a-kind networking opportunities. Cutting-edge research is presented by authors of international repute. Attractively presented in a high-quality context, and published in German and English, the original articles introduce new concepts and highlight unconventional solution strategies.

> more about q&more

q&more is supported by:

 

Your browser is not current. Microsoft Internet Explorer 6.0 does not support some functions on Chemie.DE