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Prof. Dr. Christian Kramer

Universität Innsbruck, Institut für Allgemeine, Anorganische und Theoretische Chemie

Foto: Jürgen Brickmann

born in 1980, studied Molecular Sciences in Erlangen and Zürich. He did his doctorate between 2007–2009 at the University of Erlangen in close collaboration with Boehringer-Ingelheim/Biberach, developing novel QSAR and QSPR methods for the statistical prediction of physicochemical and biochemical properties. From 2010 to 2013, he was Presidential PostDoc at Novartis in Basel, with Peter Gedeck in the Computer-Aided Drug Design Group. Here he was involved in developing statistical ­approaches in docking/scoring, multipole force fields and investigating the integrity of biochemical data and. He is Assistant Professor at the University of Innsbruck since 2013. His research interests are focused on the computer-based transformation of chemical and biochemical data into scientific knowledge for molecular design. The main emphases of his work are the linking of quantum-mechanical- and force-field methods with the statistical evaluation of databases in the discovery and optimization of leads. He is the author of 24 scientific publications and holds many awards, including a Carl Duisberg Scholarship, a Novartis Presidential PostDoc Fellowship and two internal Novartis awards.

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Other articles by this author

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Knowledge instead of ignorance

Biology is naturally complex, and even the results of the simplest biochemical experiments are afflicted with experimental noise that cannot be ignored. However, biochemical measurements (…)

More about Universität Innsbruck

  • News

    When quantum particles fly like bees

    A quantum system consisting of only 51 charged atoms can assume more than two quadrillion different states. Calculating the system's behavior is a piece of cake for a quantum simulator. Yet even with today's supercomputers it is almost impossible to verify the result. A research team from t ... more

    Quantum sensors: Measuring even more precisely

    Two teams of physicists led by Peter Zoller and Thomas Monz at the University of Innsbruck, Austria, have designed the first programmable quantum sensor, and tested it in the laboratory. To do so they applied techniques from quantum information processing to a measurement problem. The innov ... more

    How particulate matter arises from pollutant gases

    When winter smog takes over Asian mega-cities, more particulate matter is measured in the streets than expected. An international team, including researchers from Goethe University Frankfurt, as well as the universities in Vienna and Innsbruck, has now discovered that nitric acid and ammoni ... more

  • q&more articles

    Knowledge instead of ignorance

    Biology is naturally complex, and even the results of the simplest biochemical experiments are afflicted with experimental noise that cannot be ignored. However, biochemical measurements are the backbone of modern pharmaceutical research. If the experimental uncertainty is underestimated, b ... more

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