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Dr. David Hicks

Université de Strasbourg, Institut des Neurosciences Cellulaires et Intégratives (INCI)

born in 1956, studied zoology at the University of Bristol, UK, before gaining his doctorate in developmental neuropsychology in London (1978–81). He subsequently spent a postdoc sojourn at the Faculty of Biochemistry at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada, where he first researched the retina. Another postdoc sojourn followed in 1984 at the Rockefeller University in New York, USA, where he worked in C. Barnstable’s team and under Nobel Prize winner Torsten Weisel (1981 Nobel Prize for Medicine). In 1988 he moved to the laboratory of Y. Courtois at INSERM in Paris. He was promoted to full professor in 1992, relocated to the municipal hospital in Strasbourg at the same time and co-founded a retinal research laboratory there. In 2005 he transferred to the Institute of Neuroscience at the University of Strasbourg. His research work centres on the relationship between circadian rhythm and the physiology/pathology of the retina.

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A Light for Time, and a Time for Light

As everybody knows, our eyes are the sensory organs that allow us to see the world around us. Light enters the eye through the pupil and strikes the photosensitive retina at the back to (…)

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    A Light for Time, and a Time for Light

    As everybody knows, our eyes are the sensory organs that allow us to see the world around us. Light enters the eye through the pupil and strikes the photosensitive retina at the back to commence a complex biochemical and physiological process that we know as vision. This ability is vital to ... more

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