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Author

Prof. Dr. Caroline Stokes

Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin - Thaer-Institut für Agrar- und Gartenbauwissenschaften

Prof. Dr. Caroline Stokes

Caroline Stokes, born in 1978, previously worked as a researcher at the Medical Research Council, Human Nutrition Research in Cambridge, England, and for the British National Health Service. She obtained her PhD from the Medical Faculty of Saarland University, where she subsequently qualified as a professor in Nutritional Medicine in 2017. In 2019 she moved to Berlin to take up a guest professorship in Food and Health at the Thaer Institute, Faculty of Life Sciences, Humboldt University of Berlin. Since 2020 she has also been a group leader at the German Institute of Human Nutrition in Potsdam-Rehbruecke.

Leitmotif

“Intelligence is the ability to adapt to change.” (Stephen Hawking)

Activities

Caroline Stokes is interested in evidence-based medicine. She has previously worked together with the Cochrane Organisation, has been a member of several societies, and has recently worked with the German Society for Digestive and Metabolic Diseases (DGVS) and German Society for Surgery of the Alimentary Tract (DGAV) to establish evidence-based key recommendations for the prophylaxis, diagnosis and treatment of gallstones. She is currently part of a Berlin-funded initiative, where together with scientists from various backgrounds she will systematically study the social cohesion-food-health nexus, integrating perspectives from multidisciplinary fields including the medical and nutritional sciences, the social and political sciences, and nutrition and innovation systems research.

Awards

Caroline Stokes has received both academic and research awards, including the Van Den Berghs Prize from King’s College London, the National Health Service Journal Award and research-related stipends from the European Association for the Study of the Liver.

Focus

Caroline Stokes is interested in exploring the effect food and nutrients have on health outcomes, with the vitamin D metabolic phenotype being of particular interest. Recently, this curiosity has extended to understanding the spectrum of vitamin D metabolites present in plants, in addition to their specific functions. The motivation behind this research is to discover more edible and sustainable sources of vitamin D.

Facts, background information, dossiers

  • nutritional medicine
  • human nutrition
  • evidence-based medicine
  • vitamin D
  • vitamin D metabolites
  • sources of vitamin D

Other articles by this author

All articles

Vitamin D in plants

A vitamin is defined as an organic molecule essential for health. Indeed, vitamin D has been associated with bone health and with immune-related effects, however a vitamin D deficiency has (…)

More about Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin - ADTI für Agrar- und Gartenbauwissenschaften

  • q&more articles

    Vitamin D in plants

    A vitamin is defined as an organic molecule essential for health. Indeed, vitamin D has been associated with bone health and with immune-related effects, however a vitamin D deficiency has been associated with chronic diseases and mortality [1]. more

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